Saturday, May 26, 2007

Moved In







Nearly four weeks into this new adventure and we're almost completely moved in. Ginger and I were very pleased with the work done during our apartment renovation. You can't beat the cost of labor in Poland. All tolled, I think the labor for six days of tile and flooring work was about $400 US. Nice, huh? It would cost me that much in duct tape alone if I tried to do it myself. The fact that we were able to find an apartment and renovate it in a period of about two weeks is completely of the Lord. That just doesn't happen in Poland. Ginger is now busy making our things fit into 800 sq. feet. The apartment is smaller than we Americans are used to but it is large by Polish standards. Our home in the states is about twice the size, but we honestly dont feel "caged in." I think layout helps, there is a large entryway that gives it an open feeling. I also believe that we Americans don't need as much space as we think to be happy.

What I can't get over is the whole "warm drink" thing here. It's literally culturally unacceptable to serve ice cold drinks. They believe that doing so causes sore throats and colds. Whoever heard of such insanity. The milk here doesn't have the preservatives we have in the States so it is sold at room temperature and can last on the shelf for a month. Imagine waking up in the morning and putting that into your cereal. Talk about cultural barriers. We bought a fridge and got it running last week and the first thing I did was fill some ice trays we brought from the states. Combined the ice with water I let sit in the freezer for half an hour and only one word describes it . . . .OASIS. You can feel the refreshment right now can't you. I think its the little things that keep you sane when you are adjusting to a new culture. All in all, the adjustment hasn't been bad to this point. Living in a smaller town allows you to learn your way around quickly and it allows you to make friends and acquaintances more easily. To this point Ginger and I have found the people here in Siedlce friendly and sympathetic to our plight concerning the language. Thank you for your prayers and don't forget to hug that refreshing glass of a ice water a little closer today.

12 comments:

Kristin said...

Everything looks great! Much better than it did a week ago when we left boxes piled up in the living room! We haven't seen the bedrooms yet though...

Kathi Hayes said...

Your apartment looks really nice. BTW Thai people believe that putting ice in your drinks prolongs (not actually causes) sore throats and colds. Ging grew up on what we call "box" milk ...that's all they had here in Thailand for the longest time. Thanks for sharing these interesting cultural differences with us.

Lisa said...

WOW! Your place looks beautiful. I love the hardwood floors!!! Very simple, and classic. Gingers fingerprints all over the place. I just love it.
Thank you so much for the poatcrad, and candy bar. I am going to keep the postcard forever. I love your words you wrote to me, and well, the candy bar..I'll try to keep that one forever, but I can't promise anything.
I have been praying for you, and will continue to do so as I have my cup of java in the morning.
I miss you. When I really begin to feel sorry for myself, God quickly comes to mind, and knocks me across the noggin, and asks, "WHY????? They are exactly where they are suppose to be!!!!" OUCH! Then oddly enough, and just as quick as the blow to the head, I feel better.
But, I'd like to call you. How do I do that??

The Stover Family said...

Lisa,

You can call us real easy and for about 1c a minute. Go to www.callingcards.com and search from calling cards for calling from the U.S. to Poland. Here's my number 011 48 509668283. You guys are 7 hours behind us.

Ginger

Sara said...

You are so very right about Americans feeling like they "need" so much space. My employers (I am a nanny) live in a home that is 11,000 sq feet! Isn't that crazy?!?! Glad you are adjusting well. Your house is adorable! And cold drinks are a must for me too, but I remember being in Cambodia and drinking warm everything. You will get used to it, I'm sure. Take care and thanks for keeping us updated!

The Stover Family said...

Sara,

I plan on not getting used to it. We want to jump right into the culture, but warm drinks???? Well, I didn't sign up for that.

Jason

Paul said...

hi stovers...i enjoyed reading the letter judy just put on my desk and am glad the transition has gone well for you guys. we'll be praying for you. may the Lord give you fruit for your labors in His time and patience for the journey. we love you,
paul and judy

Josh & Bekah said...

Looks like you all are getting settled bit by bit. We have been praying for you as you enter this new phase of ministry.
Thanks for the comments on our blog. We are very excited and are completly enjoying them. Praise the Lord for His abundant blessings.
Bekah

Hairgrove's Hangout said...

We have so enjoyed your e-mails and your blog is beautiful. So happy your home looks so nice for you. We continue to pray that your ministry will grow and others will see Jesus in you. Thanks for keeping us updated.
Loves and hugs!

Anonymous said...

Hi Jason & Ginger, We think God is working out all things well for you guys,and we are so happy for you. Love & miss you all so much.It has been quite a week for me. All the test came back ok so PTL for that. Joyce june 7th,2007 6:01pm

The Stover Family said...

Yes, that was a relief to hear. We have been praying for you Joyce.

Anonymous said...

You paid $400.00 for a week's labor, WOW! Not bad, however you can get your hvac system worked on in Chicago by Polish people for about half the price. In Many cases a furnace installed for peanuts. The Polish are such hard workers. I'm thinking about renaming my business to Goofstawski's HVAC. What do you think?